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BACKYARD 1 — BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA
at 9601 Oak Pass Rd. (1938—1957)
LOS ANGELES COUNTY, in the E. SANTA MONICA MOUNTAINS
Historical Macro-Moth Study (1953-1957)
homemoth familiesmona #'s foodplants seasonal charts pdfs maps links << previousarticles next >>
1B — BACKPORCH MOTH COLLECTION at 9601 Oak Pass Road (1953-1957)

WHAT TO EXPECT AT THIS CALIFORNIA SITE
This site (#1B) IS NOT DESIGNED OR INTENDED FOR SPECIMEN IDENTIFICATION! It only proffers an alphabetical listing, arranged by family / genus / species. So, you will need to have the name 'in hand' before you come here!! How to accomplish that?? FIRST, go to any of the various other sites already 'out there', which are geared explicitly to the identification of adult moths — see the External Links. It MAY indeed sometimes be possible to learn the identity of a specimen, simply by 'stumbling' onto the photo at this site — the more so if you have any inkling of the genus to which the moth belongs. TWO avenues of approach are offered here:

(1) — Go directly to the FAMILY INDEXES, to find all of the moth names in alphabetical sequence by genus and species. (And don't forget to check the Synonym list!)......

OR


(2) — If you don't have any name in hand, then just go directly to the PHOTOS, where you will find all of them arranged in sequence by MONA # (under each separate family).

The latter permits SEARCHING amongst “apparently related” spp. (which maybe found conveniently clustered together), simply by moving forward (click on “Next”), or backward (click on “Previous”) within the array of photos — provided that you have found a promising “intuitive” entry-point, at which to begin your search....My present arrangement of the photos at this website simply follows the MONA checklist (1983), which illustrates the phylogeny as it was then interpreted (or imagined!) by the various experts of that era (1960's - early 1980's) — already 25 years out-of-date at the time of this writing (2008). 18 subfamilies recognized in 1983, under the Fam. Noctuidae for example (see pp.120-159 in the MONA list), illustrate a linear arrangement of what were then the most up-to-date or "sophisticated" interpretations, of the suspected (or imagined!) kinships amongst the many North American noctuid genera.

Of course, no single linear arrangement can ever hope to convey all the intricacies of the huge noctuid family “TREE” (with its numerous “branches” and “twigs”), as it actually grew and evolved in the dim-distant past....This arena has always been fertile ground for those who love to endlessly propose and expound upon “theories”....By now, given the rapid proliferation of DNA studies, we are at last beginning to discover what really did transpire, uncontaminated by all the past imaginings? of the theory-mongers!....Perhaps they will finally be put to rest??....(One can hope!!)  Even DNA evidence is probably open to variable interpretation, but at least it won't continuing lend support to the historical tendency of taxonomists to routinely flip-flop from decade to decade!! Hopefully, those days are (almost) over! Eventually, we may arrive at a higher classification that is as close to the “truth” as it is possible to get — limited only by the usefulness of the analytical “tools” at our disposal....But don't hold your breath awaiting the arrival of that happy day — it still may be decades in coming!!

Sorry! But it is impossible to serve every 'need' with one list....Come here merely to 'browse', and you MAY end up with some identifications. BUT DON'T COUNT ON IT!!....Note: The list of generic synonyms may prove helpful. Thin pickings for the "Trophy Hunters" here: if size is all that matters, SUGGEST YOU GO ELSEWHERE!

If seeking information on the seasonal FLIGHT-PERIODS and/or local abundance of adult moths, you will find specific details here — relating, of course, primarily to the two featured localities: (1) the eastern Santa Monica Mts. north of BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA (1953-57), or (2) the HEREFORD District of SE. ARIZONA (30 years of records since Jan. 1979, in the SE. Huachuca Mts., at approx. 5,100-5,200 foot elevation)....You may also find information on the FOODPLANTS and EARLY STAGES, for some of the featured moths, if known to this writer. This was frequently 'new' (or unpublished) information at the time of discovery (note the dates attached to the rearings). Many of these foodplant records have also been shared with others over the years....

The habitats and native plants of the named localities are briefly discussed — and sometimes illustrated with photos. Also included are brief commentaries on the typical climatic patterns, seasonal differences, and seasonal peaks of moth abundance at these two widely separated North American locations. Phenological information is also sometimes discussed, under the various commentaries along the right side of the web-page. Documentation of the RESTING POSTURES of the adult moths (and sometimes of their larvae), based on a terminology I devised over 20 years ago for use in the Australian geometrid study (1988: 235-248), is also included. A summary of the adult r.p. terminology appears on p.243. [Click for pdf.] It is equally applicable to the North American Macro-Lepidoptera.

Much of the introductory material under Backyards #1B and #7 was written specifically with beginners in mind, and the intention is to highlight certain topics that are (all-too-often) totally omitted from discussion in most of the textbooks and popular field-guides. All the rest of it (abundantly covered by other writers) will NOT be found repeated here!....
1A — Growing Up Wild in the ELFIN FOREST north of Beverly Hills (1938-1957)

Dedications

Growing Up Wild in Beverly Hills!

EARLY DAYS on OAK PASS Rd. (1937-1945) and HOW the ROAD GOT ITS NAME

FIRES

- (A) Botanical Highlights

-- Historical Remarks on Oaks

-- EARLY EVOLUTIONARY STAGES of the "SMOG-DENIAL SYNDROME"!

-- OAK PASS NATIVE PLANTS TODAY (??)

-- Echos From the Past!

-- A Bit of SUMMERTIME FOGBANK-BOTANY

- (B) LOCAL BUTTERFLY HIGHLIGHTS

- (C) LOCAL BIRDS REMEMBERED

- (D) LOCAL MAMMALS REMEMBERED

- (E) REPTILES & AMPHIBIANS REMEMBERED

CONTACT INFORMATION

DESSERT (Purely for Amusement!)

THE HONEY-SNOB'S CORNER


1B — BACKPORCH MOTH COLLECTION at 9601 Oak Pass Road (1953-1957)

A five-year study (1953-1957) documenting the occurrence of 283 macro-moth species on one acre of woodland habitat at 9601 Oak Pass Rd., 5 road-miles north of Sunset Blvd., Beverly Hills (a mixture of undisturbed Southern Oak Woodland / Chaparral / Coastal Sage Scrub habitat, at 1100 ft. elevation).

WHAT TO EXPECT AT THIS CALIFORNIA SITE

ABOUT THE BACKYARD CONCEPT

BACKGROUND & INTRODUCTION

About the Moth Studies at 9601 Oak Pass Road

BEATING or SWEEPING for LARVAE - A MOST PRODUCTIVE COLLECTING TECHNIQUE

ABUNDANCE-RATINGS DEFINED

The OLD BEVERLY HILLS (OAK PASS ROAD) MOTH STUDY COMPARED WITH THREE OTHER (MORE RECENT) SURVEYS IN COASTAL SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

OBSERVED DIFFERENCES IN THE MACRO-MOTH FAUNAS OF THE ABOVE THREE OTHER SURVEYED COASTAL CALIFORNIAN LOCALITIES

HISTORICAL PHOTOS and A PLEA for FUTURE STUDIES in the SAME REGION

FRANK SALA'S CORNER

FRANK HOVORE'S CORNER


1C — HABITAT PHOTOS Documenting the Surrounding Locality (1957-1964)

1C - HABITAT PHOTOS (1957-1964)

DIRT ROADS

Copyright ©2005-2011 Noel McFarland. All Rights Reserved.